Terry McAuliffe: Putting Virginia First

This election presents a clear choice between two fundamentally different visions for Virginia. Terry McAuliffe is fighting to make Virginia the best state for business, education, and for working families to live and prosper. Ken Cuccinelli is more focused on his own agenda than what is best for the Commonwealth.

Terry McAuliffe: Putting Virginia First

Ken Cuccinelli: Focused On His Own Agenda

Terry McAuliffe is focused on improving and diversifying Virginia’s economy to expand opportunity and create jobs. He wants to make Virginia the best place for business. Ken Cuccinelli has devoted most of his career to a divisive social agenda. His focus on restricting women’s health care access caused the Washington Post to call him “the most overtly partisan Attorney General in Virginia history.”
Terry McAuliffe has proposed a plan to improve K-12 education by reforming the Standards of Learning tests and better preparing our kids for 21st Century jobs. Ken Cuccinelli has proposed a tax plan that would result in huge cuts to K-12 education. Officials from both parties have said the plan could devastate school budgets and cause major strains on local budgets.
As Governor, Terry McAuliffe will not tolerate any sort of discrimination, including ethnicity, country of origin, gender, sexual orientation, and religion. Ken Cuccinelli sponsored controversial legislation that would make speaking another language at the workplace a fire-able offense, even if the employee was speaking while on a break. He also supported legislation that would make Virginia the only state in the country to bar children who were brought here by their parents from enrolling in state colleges and requiring universities to expel undocumented students already enrolled.
Terry McAuliffe strongly believes in helping Virginia’s struggling families by supporting the expansion of Medicaid, which is a key component in providing nursing home care and home care for our seniors. Expanding Medicaid coverage would be a lifesaver for hundreds of thousands of Virginians, including 62,000 Virginians between the ages of 50 and 64 who are struggling with their current health benefits. Ken Cuccinelli called Medicare and Social Security “goodies.” In his book, Ken Cuccinelli wrote, “One of their favorite ways to increase their power is by creating programs that dispense subsidized government benefits, such as Medicare, Social Security and outright welfare (Medicaid, food stamps, subsidized housing, and the like). These programs make people dependent on government.”